Sunday, February 17, 2013

A Brush With Lincoln...

(Photo source - "A Brief History of the Yeager...Family")

In honor of President's Day weekend, I thought I would honor a relative that I just recently discovered.  In fact, it was just a few months ago that my entire family was made aware of our connection to Frederick Musser Yeager - half (or full?  more on that in another post...) brother of my maternal 2nd great-grandfather, Edward Musser Luden.  It wasn't until I stumbled upon his mother's probate record that I realized she had been married previously AND had two children of whom we were unaware.  How glad I am that I found Mr. Yeager!  A fascinating figure indeed.

Frederick Musser Yeager (1840-1920) was born in the city of  Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania - the son of Amos Bright Yeager and Sarah Ann Musser.

A member of the Ringgold Light Artillery - and the First Defenders - Frederick answered Abraham Lincoln's call for federal troops in April 1861.  From various articles and descriptions I've read, it seems that Frederick M. Yeager more than likely met President Abraham Lincoln in person after their challenging journey from Pennsylvania to Washington D.C. (through pro-Confederacy Maryland and brick-throwing protesters in Baltimore).  Apparently, President Lincoln checked on them personally - the First Defenders responding to his call for troops.

I most recently received a copy of Captain Yeager's "Personal War Sketch" from my research friends at the Berks County Historical Society.  While unwrapping several mysteries surrounding his immediate and extended family, I've come to treasure the relationship I've established with fellow researchers in Reading, PA.  Emails, Skype calls, and large manila envelopes later...and I feel like we're on a roll.  The following is my own transcription of Captain Yeager's War Sketch, written by his compatriots at the McLean Post #16, Pennsylvania Grand Army of the Republic in Reading, PA.



COMRADE: F. Musser Yeager



He was born the Seventeenth day of June, AD 1840 in Reading, COUNTY of Berks STATE of Pennsylvania, age 29 years.


Residence: Reading, PA
Occupation: Photographer
Entered the service April 7th, 1861 as a private, Ringgold Baty.
Discharged July 2nd, 1861 as Private, Ringgold Battery; reason – expiration of term.

Reenlisted August 2nd, 1863 as 1st Lieut. Co K 128th P.V.
Discharged May 2nd, 1863 as Captain, Co. K, 128th P.V.
Reason of expiration of term

Service in Ringgold Light Artillery.  First Defenders, afterward Co. A 25th Pennsylvania vol for 3 months.  Mustered April 18th 1861 on duty at Arsenal Washington D.C.  Mustered out July 2nd, 1861.  Service in Co. K 128th P.V.  Mustered in as 1 Lieut. July 28th, 1861.  Promoted to Captain Co. C, 128th P.V.  January 1st, 1863.

On duty at Camp Curtin until August 18th, 1862; then to Washington D.C.  Camped at Alington Heights August 21, 1862.  Fairfax Seminary.  Duty at Fort Woodberry August 29th.  Assigned to First Brigade, First Division 12th Corps.  Engaged at South Mountain, September 15, 1862.  Antietam September 16-17.  Duty at Sandy Hook and Maryland Heights September and October.  Advance on Warrenton, VA December 15, 1862.  Winter Quarters at Fairfax Station.  Burnsides second campaign January 20th to 24th, 1863.  Expedition after Stuarts Cavalry January 28th, 1863.  Chancellorsville campaign May 1st and 2nd.  Taken prisoner at Chancellorsville, May 2nd, 1863.  Confined in Libby Prison.  Paroled May 12th, 1863.  Returned to Regiment.

I certify that the Sketch of my WAR SERVICE as above written is true as I verily believe.

We certify that COMRADE F. Musser Yeager joined Mc Lean Post. 16, Department of Pennsylvania, December 27th, 1869.


Sources:


"War Sketch of Frederick M. Yeager."  Mc. Lean Post 16, G.A.R, Reading, Pennsylvania.




Yeager, Hon. James Martin.  A Brief History of the Yeager, Buffington, Creighton, Jacobs, Lemon, Hoffman, and Woodside families and their Collateral Kindred of Pennsylvania.  Lewistown, PA (1912).  Accessed http://archive.org/stream/briefhistoryofye00yeag#page/38/mode/1up, February 2013.


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